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Texas hydrogen research hub brings on new corporate partner

Overall, the project is one of the largest collections of renewable hydrogen production, onsite storage, and end-use technologies that are all located at the same site. Photo via utexas.edu

A Texas US Department of Energy initiative has added a new corporate player.

Hitachi Energy has joined the DOE's H2@Scale in Texas and Beyond initiative with GTI Energy, Frontier Energy, The University of Texas Austin, and others. The initiative, which opened earlier this year, plans to assist in “integrating utility-scale renewable energy sources with power grids and managing and orchestrating a variety of energy sources” according to a news release.

Most of the ‘H2@Scale project’s activities take place at University of Texas JJ Pickle Research Center in Austin. The project is part of a larger one to expand hydrogen’s role and help to decarbonize Texas. The ‘H2@Scale' project consists of multiple hydrogen production options like a vehicle refueling station alongside a fleet of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

Overall, the project is one of the largest collections of renewable hydrogen production, onsite storage, and end-use technologies that are all located at the same site.

Another larger goal is to investigate the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of hydrogen generation from renewable resources, which all aligns with the project’s vision of decarbonization efforts.

Hitachi Energy is part of the full hydrogen value chain from early-stage project origination and design. They also work to ensure grid compliance, power conversion systems and asset management solutions.

“Hitachi Energy is proud to be a key partner in the US Department of Energy’s ‘H2@Scale in Texas and Beyond’ project. The initiative comes at a pivotal moment in our commitment to advancing hydrogen production and its role in the evolving clean energy landscape,” Executive Vice President and Region Head of North America at Hitachi Energy Anthony Allard says in a news release. “As hydrogen emerges as a critical element in decarbonizing hard-to-abate industries, Hitachi Energy remains dedicated to drive innovation and sustainability on a global scale.”

Hitachi’s project teams will undertake feasibility studies for scaling up hydrogen production and use, which will aim to benefit the development of a strategic plan and implementation of the H2@Scale project in the Port of Houston and the region of the Gulf Coast. The teams will also seek opportunities to leverage prospective hydrogen users, pre-existing hydrogen pipelines, and large networks of concentrated industrial infrastructure. Then, they will work to identify environmental and economic benefits of hydrogen deployment in the area.

Earlier this year, Hitachi Energy teamed up with teamed up with Houston-based electrical transmission developer Grid United for a collaboration to work on high-voltage direct current technology for Grid United transmission projects. These projects will aim to interconnect the eastern and western regional power grids in the U.S. The Eastern Interconnection east of the Rocky Mountains, the Western Interconnection west of the Rockies and the Texas Interconnection run by the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, make up the three main power grids.

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CompuCycle reports that it's the only service provider in the country that can provide a recycling solution for both metals and plastics in-house. Courtesy of CompuCycle

An innovative Houston company focused on sustainable tech recycling has expanded.

CompuCycle describes its unique Plastics Recycling System as the first and only certified, single solution e-waste recycling business. The company's unique process can now break down discarded technology products into single polymers that can then be reused in the manufacturing process.

“Properly managing all components of electronics is a cornerstone of sustainability and environmental responsibility,” Kelly Adels Hess, CEO of CompuCycle, says in a news release. “Making single polymer plastics that original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) can reuse to produce new electronics or other products, while adhering to international recycling standards, is a gamechanger for domestic companies and those that need their plastics shipped globally.”

As of now, CompuCycle reports that it's the only service in the country that can provide a recycling solution for both metals and plastics in-house. The company has met the Environmental Protection Agency’s two accredited certification standards, e-Stewards and R2 certification requirements, per the release.

“We saw an opportunity to solve an industry challenge by creating the first domestic, sustainable, single-solution e-waste plastics program that reduces the amount of plastic negatively impacting the environment, while also making it advantageous for companies to recycle and reuse. It’s truly a win for everyone involved,” adds Clive Hess, president at CompuCycle.

CompuCycle, which has over a 20-year history, added recycling electronics to its toolkit in 2019. While CompuCycle has focused on responsible electronics disposal since Kelly's father-in-law, John Hess, founded the company in 1996, certain recent events have increased the need to recycle more efficiently.

"China is no longer accepting scrap, which is where a lot of materials would go after it was dismantled," Kelly told InnovationMap in 2019. "That's why we've created this solution to be able to responsibly handle it here in the U.S."

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