sunsetting solar?

Shell shrinks renewable portfolio yet again with latest divestment

Shell’s Savion subsidiary, which the energy giant acquired in 2021, plans to sell about one-fourth of its solar generation and storage assets. Photo via shell.us

In a move aimed at focusing more on its oil and gas business, Houston-based Shell USA continues to scale back its wind and solar energy portfolio.

The Reuters news service reported February 29 that Shell’s Savion subsidiary, which the energy giant acquired in 2021, plans to sell about one-fourth of its solar generation and storage assets. These assets represent as much as 10.6 gigawatts of generation and storage capacity.

This development follows the completion in early February of deals for Kansas City, Missouri-based Savion to sell its 50 percent stake in a solar energy project in Ohio and for Houston-based Shell Wind Energy to sell its 60 percent stake in a wind farm in Texas.

The buyer of the Texas and Ohio assets was London-based investment manager InfraRed Capital Partners. Shell says it’ll manage both projects.

On its website, Savion says it has solar generation and storage projects underway totaling 38.1 gigawatts of capacity. Meanwhile, it has completed projects offering another 2.3 gigawatts of capacity.

During an investor presentation last June, Shell CEO Wael Sawan indicated that, for now, the company would put more of an emphasis on higher-profit oil and gas production and less of an emphasis on lower-profit renewable energy generation.

“It is critical that the world avoids dismantling the current energy system faster than we are able to build the clean energy system of the future. Oil and gas will continue to play a crucial role in the energy system for a long time to come, with demand reducing only gradually over time,” said Sawan, adding that “continued investment in oil and gas is critical to ensure a balanced energy transition.”

Sawan rose to the top post at Shell in January 2023, replacing Ben van Beurden. Sawan previously was Shell’s director of integrated gas, and renewables and energy solutions.

Reflecting Shell’s shifting priorities under Sawan’s leadership, the company’s spending in its renewables and energy solutions division fell 23 percent in 2023 compared with previous year, according to a Reuters analysis.

Trending News

A View From HETI

The combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology. Photo via Getty Images

SLB announced its plans to combine its carbon capture business with Norway company, Aker Carbon Capture.

Upon completion of the transaction, which is expected to close by the end of the second quarter of this year, SLB will own 80 percent of the combined business and ACC will own 20 percent.

According to a SLB news release, the combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology.

“For CCUS to have the expected impact on supporting global net-zero ambitions, it will need to scale up 100-200 times in less than three decades,” Olivier Le Peuch, CEO of SLB, says in the release. “Crucial to this scale-up is the ability to lower capture costs, which often represent as much as 50-70% of the total spend of a CCUS project.

The International Energy Agency estimates that over one gigaton of CO2 every year year will need to be captured by 2030 — a figure that scales up to over six gigatons by 2050.

"We are excited to create this business with ACC to accelerate the deployment of carbon capture technologies that will shift the economics of carbon capture across high-emitting industrial sectors,” Le Peuch continues.

SLB is slated to pay NOK 4.12 billion — around $379.4 million — to own 80 percent of Aker Carbon Capture Holding AS, which owns ACC, per the news release, and SLB may also pay up to NOK 1.36 billion over the next three years, depending on business performance.

Trending News