The View from HETI

Introducing the Houston Energy Transition Initiative

“HETI’s objective is to create a vision and a blueprint for growing the region’s economy, exporting low-carbon products and expertise, equitably creating new jobs, and helping the city of Houston achieve the goals of its Climate Action Plan.” Image via htxenergytransition.org

For over 100 years, Houston has long been considered the energy capital of the world. With newer, cleaner energy initiatives on the rise, Houston is poised to continue with the title.

The economic vitality and growth of our region’s economy is inextricably tied to the energy industry, and the industry is changing rapidly to meet growing global energy demand while simultaneously lowering emissions. The Greater Houston Partnership’s Houston Energy Transition Initiative (HETI) builds on the best of traditional energy skills and systems to leverage Houston’s industry leadership to accelerate global solutions for an energy-abundant, low-carbon future.

“HETI’s objective is to create a vision and a blueprint for growing the region’s economy, exporting low-carbon products and expertise, equitably creating new jobs, and helping the city of Houston achieve the goals of its Climate Action Plan,” said Jane Stricker, Senior Vice President Energy Transition and Executive Director of HETI. “There is no geography in the world better positioned than Houston to lead the transition to and integration of abundant, low-carbon energy solutions.”

HETI harnesses Houston's industry leadership as well as capitalizes on traditional energy expertise and infrastructure to facilitate worldwide solutions for an energy abundant, low-carbon future. Over the last two years, HETI’s developed a strategic plan and fully launched this strategy to help companies meet the dual challenge.

"Houston has both the opportunity and a responsibility to lead the transition. It is our opportunity to embrace, and our challenge to solve. And when we are successful, we will be creating opportunity for the generations of Houstonians to come," said Bobby Tudor, Chair, Houston Energy Transition Initiative

HETI has formed working groups dedicated to driving progress in key sectors where Houston holds a strategic edge. These active sector-specific working groups are: CCUS, Capital Formation, Power Management, Clean Hydrogen, and Industry Decarbonization. All these groups are working closely with HETI members to accelerate solutions to help take on the dual challenge of meeting the world's increasing energy needs, while also reducing CO2 emissions.

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The Greater Houston Partnership's Houston Energy Transition Initiative, or HETI, exists to support Houston's future as an energy leader. For more information about the Houston Energy Transition Initiative, EnergyCapitalHTX's presenting sponsor, visit htxenergytransition.org.

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A View From HETI

After recently divesting from wind and solar energy initiatives, Shell has plans to quadruple EV charging stations in the next several years. Photo via shell.com

As it downshifts sales of fuel for traditional vehicles, energy giant Shell is stepping up its commitment to public charging stations for electric vehicles.

In a new report on energy transition, Shells lays out an aggressive plan for growing its public network of charging stations for electric vehicles (EVs). The company plans to boost the global number of public EV charging stations from about 54,000 today to around 70,000 by 2025 and about 200,000 by 2030.

The projected growth from today to 2030 would represent a 270 percent increase in the number of Shell-operated EV charging stations.

“We have a major competitive advantage in terms of locations, as our global network of service stations is one of the largest in the world,” Shell says in the report.

Shell’s global network of service stations is shrinking, though. In the report, the company reveals plans to close a total of 1,000 gas stations in 2024 and 2025. Today, more than 45,000 Shell-branded gas stations are located in over 90 countries.

Aside from Shell gas stations, the company’s Shell Recharge business unit operates public EV charging stations along streets, at grocery stores, and at other locations in 33 countries.

Shell, whose U.S. headquarters is in Houston, is ramping up its EV charging network amid forecasts of slowing demand for oil and rising demand for EVs. Other than EV charging, Shell is focusing on biofuels and integrated power as components of its revamped product mix.

“Shell is well positioned to become a profitable leader in public charging for electric vehicles, meeting the growing demand from drivers who need to charge on the go,” the report says.

To accelerate its EV charging presence in the U.S., Shell in 2023 purchased Volta, a San Francisco-based operator of EV charging stations. Shell says it now operates one of the largest public EV charging networks in the U.S., with more than 3,000 charging points in 31 states and another 3,400 under development.

“The availability of charging points will be critical for the growth in electric vehicles,” the report says.

Last month, Shell divested from a solar energy subsidiary, before later announcing an exit from a wind energy joint venture.

"In-line with our Powering Progress strategy, Shell continues to hone our portfolio of renewable generation projects in key markets where we have an advantaged position," Glenn Wright, senior vice president at Shell Energy Americas, said in a news release at the time.

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