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Houston university launches latest micro-credential course focused on AI, robotics for the energy industry

The new course will provide participants with insights on how to use robotics to enhance efficiency in data collection, AI data analysis tools for industry, risk management with AI, and more. Photo courtesy of UH

The University of Houston will launch its latest micro-credential course next month that focuses on how AI and robotics can be used in inspection processes for the energy industry.

Running from March 22 through April 22, the course is open to "engineers, technicians and industry professionals with advanced knowledge in the dynamic fields of robotics and AI," according to a statement from UH. It will combine weekly online lectures and in-person hands-on demonstrations and provide participants with insights on how to use robotics to enhance efficiency in data collection, AI data analysis tools for industry, risk management with AI, and more.

“By blending theoretical knowledge with practical applications and hands-on experience, the course aims to empower participants with the skills needed to evaluate and adopt these advanced technologies to address real-world challenges in asset management,” Vedhus Hoskere, assistant professor at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, said in a statement. “We hope that upskilling and knowledge gained from this course will help accelerate the adoption of AI and robotics and contribute to the advancement of safer and more resource-efficient energy infrastructure systems.”

Hoskere will teach the course module titled “Computer Vision and Deep Learning for Inspections.” He also recently received a $500,000 grant from the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) to look at how to use drones, cameras, sensors and AI to support Texas' bridge maintenance programs.

Other leaders of the UH Energy course will include:

  • Kimberley Hayes, founder of Valkim Technologies: Lead speaker who will provide an overview and introduction of AI applications, standards and certification
  • Gangbing Song, Moores Professor of Mechanical Engineering at UH: Machine learning hands-on exercises
  • Pete Peterson, head of product management and marketing with XaaS Lab: Computer vision technology in the oil and gas industry
  • Matthew Alberts, head of project management with Future Technologies Venture Venture LLC: Use cases, workflow and optimizing inspections with AI and drones
  • Suchet Bargoti, chief technology officer at Abyss Solutions: AI and robots for integrity management.

Registration accepted up to the first day of the course and can be completed online.

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A View From HETI

The combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology. Photo via Getty Images

SLB announced its plans to combine its carbon capture business with Norway company, Aker Carbon Capture.

Upon completion of the transaction, which is expected to close by the end of the second quarter of this year, SLB will own 80 percent of the combined business and ACC will own 20 percent.

According to a SLB news release, the combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology.

“For CCUS to have the expected impact on supporting global net-zero ambitions, it will need to scale up 100-200 times in less than three decades,” Olivier Le Peuch, CEO of SLB, says in the release. “Crucial to this scale-up is the ability to lower capture costs, which often represent as much as 50-70% of the total spend of a CCUS project.

The International Energy Agency estimates that over one gigaton of CO2 every year year will need to be captured by 2030 — a figure that scales up to over six gigatons by 2050.

"We are excited to create this business with ACC to accelerate the deployment of carbon capture technologies that will shift the economics of carbon capture across high-emitting industrial sectors,” Le Peuch continues.

SLB is slated to pay NOK 4.12 billion — around $379.4 million — to own 80 percent of Aker Carbon Capture Holding AS, which owns ACC, per the news release, and SLB may also pay up to NOK 1.36 billion over the next three years, depending on business performance.

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