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Honeywell introduces new AI software to enhance battery cell management at gigafactories

Honeywell launched the Battery Manufacturing Excellence Platform, or Battery MXP. Photo via honeywell.com

As the world continues to electrify, new optimized battery technology is critical, and Honeywell, which has a unit of its business based in Houston, recognizes that.

Honeywell (NASDAQ: HON) launched the Battery Manufacturing Excellence Platform, or Battery MXP, an artificial intelligence-powered software solution that will improve battery cell yields and, by extension, operation of gigafactories for manufacturers.

"With Honeywell's Battery MXP and its automation capabilities, we will be able to quickly and effectively establish a foundation for our network of gigafactories," John Kem, president of American Battery Factory, says in a statement. "This solution is vital in our manufacturing operation because it allows us to reduce scrap and scale up quickly, while also ensuring we meet the U.S. and international demand for high quality lithium iron phosphate batteries as we prepare for the unprecedented surge expected over the next decade."

The AI technology built into the platform can detect and remediate quality issues, preventing scrapped or wasted material. Per the news release, the platform can reduce startup material scrap rates by 60 percent.

"The electrification of everyday life continues to increase global demand for quality lithium-ion batteries to power electric vehicles, consumer electronics and battery energy storage systems," Pramesh Maheshwari, president of Honeywell Process Solutions, adds. "With the construction of more than 400 gigafactories planned worldwide by 2030, Honeywell's Battery MXP is a crucial technology that enables manufacturers to maximize cell yields and reach peak production much quicker than traditional methods."

Battery MXP can provide real-time information from raw material sage to finished product. The platform additionally creates enhanced safety measures.

Last month, Weatherford and Honeywell announced the partnership that will combine Honeywell's emissions management suite with Weatherford's technology.

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Here's 1PoinFive's newest customer on its Texas CCUS project. Photo via 1pointfive.com

Occidental Petroleum’s Houston-based carbon capture, utilization and, sequestration (CCUS) subsidiary, 1PointFive, has inked a six-year deal to sell 500,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide removal credits to software giant Microsoft.

In a news release, 1Point5 says this agreement represents the largest-ever single purchase of carbon credits enabled by direct air capture (DAC). DAC technology pulls CO2 from the air at any location, not just where carbon dioxide is emitted.

Under the agreement, the carbon dioxide that underlies the credits will be stored in a below-the-surface saline aquifer and won’t be used to produce oil or gas.

“A commitment of this magnitude further demonstrates how one of the world’s largest corporations is integrating scalable [DAC] into its net-zero strategy,” says Michael Avery, president and general manager of 1PointFive. “Energy demand across the technology industry is increasing, and we believe [DAC] is uniquely suited to remove residual emissions and further climate goals.”

Brian Marrs, senior director for carbon removal and energy at Microsoft, says DAC plays a key role in Microsoft’s effort to become carbon-negative by 2030.

The carbon dioxide will be stored at 1PointFive’s first industrial-scale DAC plant, being built near Odessa. The $1.3 billion Stratos project, which 1Point5 is developing through a joint venture with investment manager BlackRock, is designed to capture up to 500,000 metric tons of CO2 per year.

The facility is scheduled to open in mid-2025.

Aside from Microsoft, organizations that have agreed to buy carbon removal credits from 1Point5 include Amazon, Airbus, All Nippon Airways, the Houston Astros, the Houston Texans, and TD Bank.

Occidental says 1PointFive plans to set up more than 100 DAC facilities worldwide by 2035.

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