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Chevron names SaaS startup to Houston accelerator program

Cerebre is a software-as-a-service company that works with its customers to unlock and leverage data to tap into AI tools and digitization. Photo via cerebre.io

A Boston-based startup that provides software for manufacturing plants has joined a Houston-based corporate accelerator.

Cerebre, a software-as-a-service company that works with its customers to unlock and leverage data to tap into AI tools and digitization, has joined Chevron Technology Ventures as part of its Catalyst Program.

“We are thrilled and honored to be selected by Chevron as part of the Catalyst Program," Founder and CEO Jeff Robbins says in a news release. "We are witnessing an explosion and convergence of technology never seen before.

"As the world races to build AI, we have worked extensively to help companies feed their AI models with high-quality data that represents the plant and their business," he continues. "We are energized to be recognized by Chevron as having a potential role to play in the industry’s transformation.”

Founded in 2017, the Catalyst Program accelerates early-stage companies that are working to transform the energy sector. CTV launched in 1999 to support externally developed technologies and new business solution.

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A View From HETI

The combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology. Photo via Getty Images

SLB announced its plans to combine its carbon capture business with Norway company, Aker Carbon Capture.

Upon completion of the transaction, which is expected to close by the end of the second quarter of this year, SLB will own 80 percent of the combined business and ACC will own 20 percent.

According to a SLB news release, the combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology.

“For CCUS to have the expected impact on supporting global net-zero ambitions, it will need to scale up 100-200 times in less than three decades,” Olivier Le Peuch, CEO of SLB, says in the release. “Crucial to this scale-up is the ability to lower capture costs, which often represent as much as 50-70% of the total spend of a CCUS project.

The International Energy Agency estimates that over one gigaton of CO2 every year year will need to be captured by 2030 — a figure that scales up to over six gigatons by 2050.

"We are excited to create this business with ACC to accelerate the deployment of carbon capture technologies that will shift the economics of carbon capture across high-emitting industrial sectors,” Le Peuch continues.

SLB is slated to pay NOK 4.12 billion — around $379.4 million — to own 80 percent of Aker Carbon Capture Holding AS, which owns ACC, per the news release, and SLB may also pay up to NOK 1.36 billion over the next three years, depending on business performance.

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