teaming up

Houston energy tech company taps Microsoft tools to accelerate AI adoption for decarbonization

The collaboration will help Amperon's energy sector clients to "successfully navigate the evolving grid to improve reliability, optimize asset economics, and accelerate decarbonization." Photo via amperon.co

Amperon has announced that it is replatforming its AI-powered energy analytics technology onto Microsoft Azure.

The collaboration will help Amperon's energy sector clients to "successfully navigate the evolving grid to improve reliability, optimize asset economics, and accelerate decarbonization," according to the company.

"This collaboration with Microsoft marks a significant step forward in our mission to modernize energy data and AI infrastructure. By replatforming our technology onto Microsoft Azure and enabling our customers to use Microsoft's analytics stack with our data, we aim to empower users to make informed decisions as they navigate the energy transition," Abe Stanway, CTO of Amperon, says in the news release.

Amperon, which announced last fall that it closed its series B round at $20 million, created a platform that provides AI modeling and forecasting methodologies critical to decision making as energy companies decarbonize amid the evolving energy transition. The combined technology and tools will only enhance the user experience with modern data capabilities, per the release

"We are pleased to collaborate with Amperon to enable our customers with a scalable data analytics platform for forecasting – one of the most essential ingredients to managing an increasingly complex energy grid. Together, we will drive energy solution advancements and contribute to a more sustainable future," adds Hanna Grene of Microsoft.

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A View From HETI

The combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology. Photo via Getty Images

SLB announced its plans to combine its carbon capture business with Norway company, Aker Carbon Capture.

Upon completion of the transaction, which is expected to close by the end of the second quarter of this year, SLB will own 80 percent of the combined business and ACC will own 20 percent.

According to a SLB news release, the combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology.

“For CCUS to have the expected impact on supporting global net-zero ambitions, it will need to scale up 100-200 times in less than three decades,” Olivier Le Peuch, CEO of SLB, says in the release. “Crucial to this scale-up is the ability to lower capture costs, which often represent as much as 50-70% of the total spend of a CCUS project.

The International Energy Agency estimates that over one gigaton of CO2 every year year will need to be captured by 2030 — a figure that scales up to over six gigatons by 2050.

"We are excited to create this business with ACC to accelerate the deployment of carbon capture technologies that will shift the economics of carbon capture across high-emitting industrial sectors,” Le Peuch continues.

SLB is slated to pay NOK 4.12 billion — around $379.4 million — to own 80 percent of Aker Carbon Capture Holding AS, which owns ACC, per the news release, and SLB may also pay up to NOK 1.36 billion over the next three years, depending on business performance.

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