all aboard

Houston subsea tech company makes acquisition, plans to grow renewables biz

The acquisition is valued at $34 million. Photo via Nauticus Robotics

A Houston company that harnesses the power of robotics hardware and programing for underwater use has made an acquisition.

Nauticus Robotics Inc. (NASDAQ: KITT) announced it has acquired 3D at Depth Inc., a Colorado-based company with a subsea light detection and range, LiDAR, technology for inspection and data services. The deal closed for approximately $34 million in stock, before certain purchase price adjustments and the assumption of debt, per the news release.

“The future of subsea services lies in autonomy, data gathering, and analytics,” Nicolaus Radford, Nauticus’ founder and CEO, says in the release. “LiDAR has long since been core to terrestrial autonomy and by adding 3D’s capabilities to the Nauticus Fleet, we enhance autonomous vehicles in the offshore market. This acquisition increases the value of Nauticus’ fleet services and positions the Company to capitalize on data acquisition and analytics for subsea operations.”

The acquisition expands Nauticus' capabilities for its autonomous underwater suite of technology for its customers. With the deal, Nauticus will assume 20 patents secured or pending by acquiring 3D, which generated $9.8 million in revenue last year and is slated to grow revenue by more than 20 percent in 2023, according to the release.

“In addition to the compelling strategic and financial benefits of this deal, the acquisition will add momentum to our commercial growth trajectory,” Radford continues. “By adding 3D’s technology, offshore inspection and data service, and experienced team, Nauticus expands our addressable market and accelerates our customer penetration in the offshore energy and renewables industries.”

Founded in 2009, 3D will operate as a division of Nauticus when the deal closes sometime before the end of the year. Nauticus will also assume approximately $4.1 million of debt in the transaction.

“The Nauticus Robotics and 3D at Depth combination creates a compelling solution for the subsea market and should help improve our products and services for all our clients,” Carl Embry, founder and CEO of 3D at Depth, says in the release. “We believe the integration of our unique subsea multi-dimensional data collection and processing with an emerging leader in subsea robotics creates a differentiated offering for customers seeking safer, cleaner, lower-cost subsea services.”

Nauticus, founded by Radford in 2014 as Houston Mechatronics, went public via a blank check company last year.

———

This article originally ran on InnovationMap

Trending News

A View From HETI

The combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology. Photo via Getty Images

SLB announced its plans to combine its carbon capture business with Norway company, Aker Carbon Capture.

Upon completion of the transaction, which is expected to close by the end of the second quarter of this year, SLB will own 80 percent of the combined business and ACC will own 20 percent.

According to a SLB news release, the combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology.

“For CCUS to have the expected impact on supporting global net-zero ambitions, it will need to scale up 100-200 times in less than three decades,” Olivier Le Peuch, CEO of SLB, says in the release. “Crucial to this scale-up is the ability to lower capture costs, which often represent as much as 50-70% of the total spend of a CCUS project.

The International Energy Agency estimates that over one gigaton of CO2 every year year will need to be captured by 2030 — a figure that scales up to over six gigatons by 2050.

"We are excited to create this business with ACC to accelerate the deployment of carbon capture technologies that will shift the economics of carbon capture across high-emitting industrial sectors,” Le Peuch continues.

SLB is slated to pay NOK 4.12 billion — around $379.4 million — to own 80 percent of Aker Carbon Capture Holding AS, which owns ACC, per the news release, and SLB may also pay up to NOK 1.36 billion over the next three years, depending on business performance.

Trending News