seeing green

LyondellBasell acquires California plastics recycling operations

The plan is to operate the newly-acquired mechanical recycling plant in California to manufacture post-consumer recycled resins using plastic waste feedstock. Photo courtesy of LyondellBasell

LyondellBasell has made a strategic acquisition of a plastics recycling facility.

The Houston-based company acquired the mechanical recycling assets containing rigid plastics recycling processing lines from recycling and waste management service provider PreZero. With the acquisition, LyondellBasell gains the processing facility in Jurupa Valley, California, with a production capacity of 50 million pounds per year for recycled materials.

The plan is to operate the newly-acquired mechanical recycling plant in California to manufacture post-consumer recycled resins using plastic waste feedstock, according to LyondellBasell. LyondellBasell aims to use recycled polymers under its CirculenRecover brand, which is part of the company's Circulen portfolio of products that enable the circular economy.

"This acquisition further strengthens our U.S. presence and will deliver value for our customers and plastic recycling rates in the West Coast," Yvonne van der Laan, LyondellBasell executive vice president, Circular and Low Carbon Solutions, says in a news release. "We will build upon our existing experience in plastic recycling in Europe and deliver a state-of-the-art, mechanical recycling facility to meet growing demand for recycled products in the U.S."

In 2025, LyondellBasell expects to finish the operations at its new facility.

With the previously announced equity stake in the Cyclyx joint venture and investment in the Cyclyx Circularity Center in Houston, the latest transaction hopes to enhance the competitiveness in the U.S. recycled products market.

Trending News

A View From HETI

The combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology. Photo via Getty Images

SLB announced its plans to combine its carbon capture business with Norway company, Aker Carbon Capture.

Upon completion of the transaction, which is expected to close by the end of the second quarter of this year, SLB will own 80 percent of the combined business and ACC will own 20 percent.

According to a SLB news release, the combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology.

“For CCUS to have the expected impact on supporting global net-zero ambitions, it will need to scale up 100-200 times in less than three decades,” Olivier Le Peuch, CEO of SLB, says in the release. “Crucial to this scale-up is the ability to lower capture costs, which often represent as much as 50-70% of the total spend of a CCUS project.

The International Energy Agency estimates that over one gigaton of CO2 every year year will need to be captured by 2030 — a figure that scales up to over six gigatons by 2050.

"We are excited to create this business with ACC to accelerate the deployment of carbon capture technologies that will shift the economics of carbon capture across high-emitting industrial sectors,” Le Peuch continues.

SLB is slated to pay NOK 4.12 billion — around $379.4 million — to own 80 percent of Aker Carbon Capture Holding AS, which owns ACC, per the news release, and SLB may also pay up to NOK 1.36 billion over the next three years, depending on business performance.

Trending News