plugging into LNG

Houston companies combine for massive tugboat and export project

Houston has its stamp on the project in multiple ways with Gulf LNG Tugs boasting two Houston area companies in Bay-Houston Management LLC and Suderman & Young Towing Company. Photo via glenfarneenergytransition.com

Texas LNG, a four million tonnes per annum liquefied natural gas export terminal to be constructed in the Port of Brownsville, and a subsidiary of Glenfarne Energy Transition, announced the selection of its new partner.

Gulf LNG Tugs of Texas will operate, build, and deliver tugboats under an agreement to assist LNG carriers arriving at the facility. Tugs of Texas is part of a consortium of Suderman & Young Towing Co., Bay-Houston Towing, and Moran Towing Corp., and the tugboats will be among the “most modern, low-emissions tugboats available to serve a facility of Texas LNG’s size” according to the company. This will also align with Texas LNG’s "Green by Design" approach, and the deal is a long-term agreement.

The projected port for Texas LNG is considered to be an area with consistent operating temperatures, and reliable maritime operations with lower probability of impact from inclement weather like storms and damage associated with them. Globally, Texas LNG is also designed to be one of the lowest-emitting export terminals. Texas LNG is developing the project site on the north shore of the Port of Brownsville. This area offers access to a deep-water ship channel in close proximity to the Gulf of Mexico and the Panama Canal.

“Gulf LNG Tugs is excited to be providing marine services in a long-term partnership with Texas LNG,” the companies say in a joint statement. “We are proud to be the exclusive tug operator for LNG vessels to yet another successful LNG project in the Port of Brownsville and look forward to expanding our operations in the port and our presence in the Rio Grande Valley community."

Houston has its stamp on the project in multiple ways with Gulf LNG Tugs boasting two Houston area companies in Bay-Houston Management LLC and Suderman & Young Towing Company.

New York and Houston-based Glenfarne works to provide solutions to lower the world’s carbon footprint, which aligns with the common goals of all the companies involved.

“The Texas LNG team undertook a comprehensive process to identify a marine service provider that not only matches our commitment to environmental stewardship, but also provides our customers with reliable, cost-effective marine services,” Brendan Duval, CEO and Founder of Glenfarne Energy Transition said in a news release. “We are pleased to have Gulf LNG Tugs on board as a partner and look forward to the jobs and local content they will bring to both Texas LNG and the local Rio Grande Valley community."

Texas LNG recently announced that it signed a Heads of Agreement with EQT Corporation for natural gas liquefaction services for 0.5 MTPA of LNG, in addition to partnerships with Baker Hughes and ABB to help develop the terminal. This represents equipment selections for Texas LNG to date that is worth half a billion dollars’ worth.

Construction is slated to begin this year after the financing of the project is finalized.

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A View From HETI

The combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology. Photo via Getty Images

SLB announced its plans to combine its carbon capture business with Norway company, Aker Carbon Capture.

Upon completion of the transaction, which is expected to close by the end of the second quarter of this year, SLB will own 80 percent of the combined business and ACC will own 20 percent.

According to a SLB news release, the combined technology portfolios will accelerate the introduction of promising early-stage decarbonization technology.

“For CCUS to have the expected impact on supporting global net-zero ambitions, it will need to scale up 100-200 times in less than three decades,” Olivier Le Peuch, CEO of SLB, says in the release. “Crucial to this scale-up is the ability to lower capture costs, which often represent as much as 50-70% of the total spend of a CCUS project.

The International Energy Agency estimates that over one gigaton of CO2 every year year will need to be captured by 2030 — a figure that scales up to over six gigatons by 2050.

"We are excited to create this business with ACC to accelerate the deployment of carbon capture technologies that will shift the economics of carbon capture across high-emitting industrial sectors,” Le Peuch continues.

SLB is slated to pay NOK 4.12 billion — around $379.4 million — to own 80 percent of Aker Carbon Capture Holding AS, which owns ACC, per the news release, and SLB may also pay up to NOK 1.36 billion over the next three years, depending on business performance.

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